New words for autumn 2022

Collins have just announced the latest words to be added to their dictionary and the lead word, which just about sums up 2022, a truly momentous and awful year (certainly for some people). That word is “permacrisis”, which sums up the political and financial situation in Britain. Although this word has only just made its way into the online dictionary, it was first noted in the 1970s in an academic context. The 1970s was also a period of upheaval, change and political instability. Here are the top 10 words and phrases that have made it into the dictionary.

Carolean: Of or relating to King Charles III of Britain. It is derived from the Latin for Charles, who succeeded the much loved and respected monarch, Queen Elizabeth II who died in September.

Kyiv: The capital of the war-ravaged country of Ukraine, previously known as Kiev to English speakers.

Lawfare: Legal proceedings that are used strategically to hinder or intimidate opponents.

Partygate: The political scandal concerning parties held in British government offices during the Covid-19 lockdowns in 2021 and 2022 in breach of public health restrictions.

Permacrisis: As mentioned above, a period of instability and insecurity, especially following catastrophic events.

Quiet quitting: Doing no more work than is required contractually, particularly in order to spend more time on personal matters. I am sure some of us know of someone who is guilty of that practice!

Splooting: This involves laying flat on the stomach with legs spread out.

Sportswashing: The practice of promoting or sponsoring sporting events so as to divert attention away from controversial actions.

Vibe shift: A major or notable change in a current cultural trend or atmosphere.

Warm bank: A warm building used by people to stay in who cannot afford to heat their own homes. Examples are libraries and community centres. I have also heard of older people using their free bus passes to ride on heated buses all day to save putting their own heating on at home.

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